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Should I Repair or Replace My Oven?

Being without an oven can be truly chaotic and microwave meals and salad will only suffice for so long before you start to miss those home-cooked meals. As the panic (and hunger) starts to set in, you’ll probably be asking yourself the question; should I repair or replace my oven? 

Well today, we’re going to take a look at the benefits and drawbacks of both options. The main things you’re likely to consider are 1 – the cost, and 2 – the convenience. 

So, let’s talk through these one by one to determine how you should tackle your cooker conundrum. 

Costs

We all like to save money where we can and when appliances break down, it can really throw a spanner in the works for your monthly budget – but it doesn’t have to. 

Repair

If you decide to repair your oven, you need to start by sourcing the right high-quality oven replacement parts for your oven, that will keep it working for years to come. 

Suppliers like Cooker Spare Parts offer a wide range of replacement or like-for-like parts for the major oven brands on the market at an incredibly reasonable price. For example, you could order a brand-new genuine Rangemaster door glass seal for as little as £7.00! 

So, identifying the faulty part of your oven and seeking out a new, replacement part could be a really cost-effective way of fixing your oven. A lot of oven repairs are fairly easy to do yourself, and there are plenty of guides and step-by-step videos available online to help you save costs on repair men.  

Replace

As you might have guessed, completely replacing your oven is going to be a more expensive option than simply fixing one small part. Even bottom of the range ovens can set you back £100+ so ordering a brand-new oven might not be the best option if you’re on a tight budget. 

Of course, if your existing oven is starting to fall to pieces and is going to require a lot of repairs over the next 6 months, it might be better for your bank in the long-run to invest in a new oven all together. 

If your oven is relatively new (less than a year old) it might still be under manufacturers warranty, so if the appliance failure is catastrophic you could get a replacement oven free of charge. This is always worth looking into, especially if you suspect a manufacturers fault. 

Convenience

Many of us work 9am-5pm jobs 5-days a week, so finding the time to sort your faulty oven out might be easier said than done. So which option should you choose?

Repair

Let’s break down the timescale of an average cooker repair. 

  • Your oven breaks and it takes you 10 minutes to assess the problem and identify that your oven thermostat has broken. 
  • You decide to repair your oven by ordering a new thermostat and spend a further 5 minutes looking for the make and model of your oven. 
  • You head to an oven spare parts website, and find the replacement part you need, pop it in your basket and checkout. Estimated delivery is 3-5 working days. 
  • Once the part arrives, you watch a 10-minute YouTube video and successfully fit the new part! 

Your oven is fixed within one week of it breaking, you didn’t have to spend hours browsing aisles of new cookers trying to decide which new one you should buy and the parts were delivered right to your door while you were at work. So, besides the cooker repair job itself, the process has been fairly stress-free.

Of course, if you can’t install the new part quickly, you could be looking at a slight delay in this process – but there are so many helpful guides out there that you shouldn’t have any problems. 

Replace

Now let’s look at a typical oven replacement timescale.

  • Your oven breaks and you decide you want to get rid of it and replace it with a brand-new one. You have a look at the local recycling centre, it’s only open between 9-5 on weekdays, so you’ll either have to take some time off work or wait until the weekend to take your broken oven down there. 
  • Meanwhile, you decide to go oven shopping. You start by looking online. You spend two or three hours trawling through different sites trying to find one that you like. 
  • Before making your purchase, you want to see the oven in person – (after all, you’re parting with quite a lot of money). You visit a few different showrooms over the course of the week before deciding. 
  • Then you’ve got to arrange delivery. Unlike replacement parts, the oven can’t be posted through the letterbox – so you schedule some more time off work to collect it.

This whole process could take 2, maybe even 3 weeks in total (and that’s if everything turns up on time), so replacing your oven is likely to be more of an inconvenience than ordering a replacement part.

So, it seems that, in most cases, ordering a replacement part and repairing your oven yourself is going to be a better option for you in terms of time and money spent. Of course, if your oven is experiencing an electrical or gas fault that requires the expertise of a trained technician – always seek professional help/advice first. 

wejustcompare team

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